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Medieval Anglo-saxon Recipe May Kill Mrsa Superbug - Cnn.com

Potent potion from the past | Observer-Reporter

to test the recipe using an "in vivo" wound model -- meaning it's in a live organism -- "and basically the big surprise was that it seems to be more effective than conventional antibiotic treatment." The scientists were worried they wouldn't be able to repeat the feat. But three more batches, made from scratch each time, have yielded the same results, Harrison said, and the salve appears to retain its potency for a long time after being stored in bottles in the refrigerator. The team says it now has good, replicated data showing that the medicine kills up to 90% of MRSA bacteria in "in vivo" wound biopsies from mice. Harrison says the researchers are still not completely sure how it works, but they have a few ideas -- namely, that there might be several active components in the mixture that work to attack the bacterial cells on different fronts, making it very hard for them to resist; or that by combining the ingredients and leaving them to steep in alcohol, a new, more potent bacteria-fighting molecule is created in the process. "I still can't quite believe how well this 1,000-year-old antibiotic actually seems to be working," Harrison said.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://edition.cnn.com/2015/03/31/health/anglo-saxon-potion-mrsa/index.html?eref=edition

Ancient potion recipe kills MRSA superbug | Health - WGAL Home

to test the recipe using an "in vivo" wound model -- meaning it's in a live organism -- "and basically the big surprise was that it seems to be more effective than conventional antibiotic treatment." The scientists were worried they wouldn't be able to repeat the feat. But three more batches, made from scratch each time, have yielded the same results, Harrison said, and the salve appears to retain its potency for a long time after being stored in bottles in the refrigerator. The team says it now has good, replicated data showing that the medicine kills up to 90% of MRSA bacteria in "in vivo" wound biopsies from mice.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.cnn.com/2015/03/31/health/anglo-saxon-potion-mrsa/index.html

Could a Medieval potion made of bile and garlic stop MRSA?

That has left doctors and researchers scrambling for something anything with which to fight back, and one potential weapon theyve found is fairly astounding. Folks at the University of Nottingham in England came across a 10th-century recipe for eyesalve in a volume of Balds Leechbook, which a CNN report describes as one of the earliest known medical textbooks. The salve potion calls for taking, among other things, garlic, wine and ox bile, and brewing the mixture in a brass pot. University researchers cooked up a batch, tested it and lo and behold it kicked MRSAs behind. We found that Balds eyesalve is incredibly potent as an anti-Staphylococcal antibiotic in this context, said Nottingham microbiologist Freya Harrison. We were going from a mature, established population of a few billion (MRSA) cells ...
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.observer-reporter.com/article/20150401/OPINION01/150409937

Cure for MRSA may lie in ancient potion recipe | News - Home

YOU CAN GET SICK IN A HOSPITAL, AND I DID NOT THINK THAT BEFORE THEN. Reporter: THE DEADLY INFECTION WAS JUST AS recurrent mrsa SCARY TO HER AS IT IS TO MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS WHO ARE BECOMING POWERLESS AT FIGHTING THEM. SO WE'RE STARTING TO NEED MORE ANTIBIOTICS BECAUSE WE'RE LOSING THE BATTLE WITH THE ANTIBIOTICS THAT WE HAVE. Reporter: INFECTIOUS DISEASE DOCTOR SAYS HE SUPPORTS EXPERIMENTING WITH ANCIENT MEDICINE. AND WE HAVE LESS AND LESS ANTIBIOTICS IN THE PIPELINE FOR DEVELOPMENT, SO WE'RE KIND OF HEADED INTO A DANGEROUS ZONE. Reporter: WITH THE DANGER ZONE AHEAD, DOCTORS AND RESEARCHERS ARE HOPING PAST POTIONS WILL COME BACK TO SAVE THE FUTURE. THE WOMAN WHO FOUND THIS ANCIENT RECIPE ISN'T EVEN A MICROBIOLOGIST.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.click2houston.com/news/cure-for-msra-may-lie-in-ancient-potion-recipe/32139762

The results were surprising. They found the concoction not only managed to clear up stye but also killed the MRSA bacteria in mice. According to the research, the salve destroyed virtually all traces of the bacteria when placed on the mices infected wounds. We thought that Balds eyesalve might show a small amount of antibiotic activity because each of the ingredients has been shown by other researchers to have some effect on bacteria in the lab, Harrison told The Telegraph . But we were absolutely blown away by just how effective the combination of ingredients was. The original recipe calls for garlic and onions or leeks as well as wine and the bile from a cows stomach. The mixture is boiled in a brass vessel, then strained and left for nine days. The resulting cream is applied topically. A team of scientists at Texas Tech University who were asked to recreate Harrison and Lees experiment said the product was good if not better than traditional antibiotics.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/centuries-old-potion-made-bile-garlic-stop-mrsa/

Medieval Anglo-Saxon recipe may kill MRSA superbug - CNN.com

"And so we looked at a recipe that is fairly straightforward. It's also a recipe where we are told it's the 'best of leechdoms' -- how could you not test mrsa in lungs that? So we were curious." Lee enlisted the help of the university's microbiologists to see if the remedy actually worked. The recipe calls for two species of Allium (garlic and onion or leek), wine and oxgall (bile from a cow's stomach) to be brewed in a brass vessel. "We recreated the recipe as faithfully as we could.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.wgal.com/health/thousandyearold-recipe-kills-mrsa-superbug/32105128

Medieval potion kills MRSA superbug, researchers say | New York's PIX11 / WPIX-TV

Some riders in the New York City subway in the underwear as the take part in the 2013 No Pants Subway Ride January 13, 2013. Started by Improv Everywhere, the goal is for riders to get on the subway train dressed in normal winter clothes (without pants) and keep a straight face.  AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY        (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images) We were going from a mature, established population of a few billion cells, all stuck together in this highly protected biofilm coat, to really just a few thousand cells left alive. This is a massive, massive killing ability. Diggle said the team also asked collaborators in the U.S. to test the recipe using an in vivo wound model meaning its in a live organism and basically the big surprise was that it seems to be more effective than conventional antibiotic treatment. The scientists were worried they wouldnt be able to repeat the feat. But three more batches, made from scratch each time, have yielded the same results, Harrison said, and the salve appears to retain its potency for a long time after being stored in bottles in the refrigerator. The team says it now has good, replicated data showing that the medicine kills up to 90% of MRSA bacteria in in vivo wound biopsies from mice. Harrison says the researchers are still not completely sure how it works, but they have a few ideas namely, that there might be several active components in the mixture that work to attack the bacterial cells on different fronts, making it very hard for them to resist; or that by combining the ingredients and leaving them to steep in alcohol, a new, more potent bacteria-fighting molecule is created in the process.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://pix11.com/2015/03/31/medieval-potion-kills-mrsa-superbug-researchers-say/

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